Misc. cleanups
[wimlib] / src / decompress_common.c
1 /*
2  * decompress_common.c
3  *
4  * Code for decompression shared among multiple compression formats.
5  *
6  * Author:  Eric Biggers
7  * Year:    2012 - 2014
8  *
9  * The author dedicates this file to the public domain.
10  * You can do whatever you want with this file.
11  */
12
13 #ifdef HAVE_CONFIG_H
14 #  include "config.h"
15 #endif
16
17 #include "wimlib/decompress_common.h"
18
19 #include <string.h>
20
21 #define USE_WORD_FILL
22
23 #ifdef __GNUC__
24 #  ifdef __SSE2__
25 #    undef USE_WORD_FILL
26 #    define USE_SSE2_FILL
27 #    include <emmintrin.h>
28 #  endif
29 #endif
30
31 /* Construct a direct mapping entry in the lookup table.  */
32 #define MAKE_DIRECT_ENTRY(symbol, length) ((symbol) | ((length) << 11))
33
34 /*
35  * make_huffman_decode_table() -
36  *
37  * Build a decoding table for a canonical prefix code, or "Huffman code".
38  *
39  * This takes as input the length of the codeword for each symbol in the
40  * alphabet and produces as output a table that can be used for fast
41  * decoding of prefix-encoded symbols using read_huffsym().
42  *
43  * Strictly speaking, a canonical prefix code might not be a Huffman
44  * code.  But this algorithm will work either way; and in fact, since
45  * Huffman codes are defined in terms of symbol frequencies, there is no
46  * way for the decompressor to know whether the code is a true Huffman
47  * code or not until all symbols have been decoded.
48  *
49  * Because the prefix code is assumed to be "canonical", it can be
50  * reconstructed directly from the codeword lengths.  A prefix code is
51  * canonical if and only if a longer codeword never lexicographically
52  * precedes a shorter codeword, and the lexicographic ordering of
53  * codewords of the same length is the same as the lexicographic ordering
54  * of the corresponding symbols.  Consequently, we can sort the symbols
55  * primarily by codeword length and secondarily by symbol value, then
56  * reconstruct the prefix code by generating codewords lexicographically
57  * in that order.
58  *
59  * This function does not, however, generate the prefix code explicitly.
60  * Instead, it directly builds a table for decoding symbols using the
61  * code.  The basic idea is this: given the next 'max_codeword_len' bits
62  * in the input, we can look up the decoded symbol by indexing a table
63  * containing 2**max_codeword_len entries.  A codeword with length
64  * 'max_codeword_len' will have exactly one entry in this table, whereas
65  * a codeword shorter than 'max_codeword_len' will have multiple entries
66  * in this table.  Precisely, a codeword of length n will be represented
67  * by 2**(max_codeword_len - n) entries in this table.  The 0-based index
68  * of each such entry will contain the corresponding codeword as a prefix
69  * when zero-padded on the left to 'max_codeword_len' binary digits.
70  *
71  * That's the basic idea, but we implement two optimizations regarding
72  * the format of the decode table itself:
73  *
74  * - For many compression formats, the maximum codeword length is too
75  *   long for it to be efficient to build the full decoding table
76  *   whenever a new prefix code is used.  Instead, we can build the table
77  *   using only 2**table_bits entries, where 'table_bits' is some number
78  *   less than or equal to 'max_codeword_len'.  Then, only codewords of
79  *   length 'table_bits' and shorter can be directly looked up.  For
80  *   longer codewords, the direct lookup instead produces the root of a
81  *   binary tree.  Using this tree, the decoder can do traditional
82  *   bit-by-bit decoding of the remainder of the codeword.  Child nodes
83  *   are allocated in extra entries at the end of the table; leaf nodes
84  *   contain symbols.  Note that the long-codeword case is, in general,
85  *   not performance critical, since in Huffman codes the most frequently
86  *   used symbols are assigned the shortest codeword lengths.
87  *
88  * - When we decode a symbol using a direct lookup of the table, we still
89  *   need to know its length so that the bitstream can be advanced by the
90  *   appropriate number of bits.  The simple solution is to simply retain
91  *   the 'lens' array and use the decoded symbol as an index into it.
92  *   However, this requires two separate array accesses in the fast path.
93  *   The optimization is to store the length directly in the decode
94  *   table.  We use the bottom 11 bits for the symbol and the top 5 bits
95  *   for the length.  In addition, to combine this optimization with the
96  *   previous one, we introduce a special case where the top 2 bits of
97  *   the length are both set if the entry is actually the root of a
98  *   binary tree.
99  *
100  * @decode_table:
101  *      The array in which to create the decoding table.
102  *      This must be 16-byte aligned and must have a length of at least
103  *      ((2**table_bits) + 2 * num_syms) entries.
104  *
105  * @num_syms:
106  *      The number of symbols in the alphabet; also, the length of the
107  *      'lens' array.  Must be less than or equal to
108  *      DECODE_TABLE_MAX_SYMBOLS.
109  *
110  * @table_bits:
111  *      The order of the decode table size, as explained above.  Must be
112  *      less than or equal to DECODE_TABLE_MAX_TABLE_BITS.
113  *
114  * @lens:
115  *      An array of length @num_syms, indexable by symbol, that gives the
116  *      length of the codeword, in bits, for that symbol.  The length can
117  *      be 0, which means that the symbol does not have a codeword
118  *      assigned.
119  *
120  * @max_codeword_len:
121  *      The longest codeword length allowed in the compression format.
122  *      All entries in 'lens' must be less than or equal to this value.
123  *      This must be less than or equal to DECODE_TABLE_MAX_CODEWORD_LEN.
124  *
125  * Returns 0 on success, or -1 if the lengths do not form a valid prefix
126  * code.
127  */
128 int
129 make_huffman_decode_table(u16 decode_table[const restrict],
130                           const unsigned num_syms,
131                           const unsigned table_bits,
132                           const u8 lens[const restrict],
133                           const unsigned max_codeword_len)
134 {
135         const unsigned table_num_entries = 1 << table_bits;
136         unsigned len_counts[max_codeword_len + 1];
137         u16 sorted_syms[num_syms];
138         int left;
139         void *decode_table_ptr;
140         unsigned sym_idx;
141         unsigned codeword_len;
142         unsigned stores_per_loop;
143         unsigned decode_table_pos;
144
145 #ifdef USE_WORD_FILL
146         const unsigned entries_per_word = WORDSIZE / sizeof(decode_table[0]);
147 #endif
148
149 #ifdef USE_SSE2_FILL
150         const unsigned entries_per_xmm = sizeof(__m128i) / sizeof(decode_table[0]);
151 #endif
152
153         /* Count how many symbols have each possible codeword length.
154          * Note that a length of 0 indicates the corresponding symbol is not
155          * used in the code and therefore does not have a codeword.  */
156         for (unsigned len = 0; len <= max_codeword_len; len++)
157                 len_counts[len] = 0;
158         for (unsigned sym = 0; sym < num_syms; sym++)
159                 len_counts[lens[sym]]++;
160
161         /* We can assume all lengths are <= max_codeword_len, but we
162          * cannot assume they form a valid prefix code.  A codeword of
163          * length n should require a proportion of the codespace equaling
164          * (1/2)^n.  The code is valid if and only if the codespace is
165          * exactly filled by the lengths, by this measure.  */
166         left = 1;
167         for (unsigned len = 1; len <= max_codeword_len; len++) {
168                 left <<= 1;
169                 left -= len_counts[len];
170                 if (unlikely(left < 0)) {
171                         /* The lengths overflow the codespace; that is, the code
172                          * is over-subscribed.  */
173                         return -1;
174                 }
175         }
176
177         if (unlikely(left != 0)) {
178                 /* The lengths do not fill the codespace; that is, they form an
179                  * incomplete set.  */
180                 if (left == (1 << max_codeword_len)) {
181                         /* The code is completely empty.  This is arguably
182                          * invalid, but in fact it is valid in LZX and XPRESS,
183                          * so we must allow it.  By definition, no symbols can
184                          * be decoded with an empty code.  Consequently, we
185                          * technically don't even need to fill in the decode
186                          * table.  However, to avoid accessing uninitialized
187                          * memory if the algorithm nevertheless attempts to
188                          * decode symbols using such a code, we zero out the
189                          * decode table.  */
190                         memset(decode_table, 0,
191                                table_num_entries * sizeof(decode_table[0]));
192                         return 0;
193                 }
194                 return -1;
195         }
196
197         /* Sort the symbols primarily by length and secondarily by symbol order.
198          */
199         {
200                 unsigned offsets[max_codeword_len + 1];
201
202                 /* Initialize 'offsets' so that offsets[len] for 1 <= len <=
203                  * max_codeword_len is the number of codewords shorter than
204                  * 'len' bits.  */
205                 offsets[1] = 0;
206                 for (unsigned len = 1; len < max_codeword_len; len++)
207                         offsets[len + 1] = offsets[len] + len_counts[len];
208
209                 /* Use the 'offsets' array to sort the symbols.
210                  * Note that we do not include symbols that are not used in the
211                  * code.  Consequently, fewer than 'num_syms' entries in
212                  * 'sorted_syms' may be filled.  */
213                 for (unsigned sym = 0; sym < num_syms; sym++)
214                         if (lens[sym] != 0)
215                                 sorted_syms[offsets[lens[sym]]++] = sym;
216         }
217
218         /* Fill entries for codewords with length <= table_bits
219          * --- that is, those short enough for a direct mapping.
220          *
221          * The table will start with entries for the shortest codeword(s), which
222          * have the most entries.  From there, the number of entries per
223          * codeword will decrease.  As an optimization, we may begin filling
224          * entries with SSE2 vector accesses (8 entries/store), then change to
225          * 'machine_word_t' accesses (2 or 4 entries/store), then change to
226          * 16-bit accesses (1 entry/store).  */
227         decode_table_ptr = decode_table;
228         sym_idx = 0;
229         codeword_len = 1;
230 #ifdef USE_SSE2_FILL
231         /* Fill the entries one 128-bit vector at a time.
232          * This is 8 entries per store.  */
233         stores_per_loop = (1 << (table_bits - codeword_len)) / entries_per_xmm;
234         for (; stores_per_loop != 0; codeword_len++, stores_per_loop >>= 1) {
235                 unsigned end_sym_idx = sym_idx + len_counts[codeword_len];
236                 for (; sym_idx < end_sym_idx; sym_idx++) {
237                         /* Note: unlike in the machine_word_t version below, the
238                          * __m128i type already has __attribute__((may_alias)),
239                          * so using it to access the decode table, which is an
240                          * array of unsigned shorts, will not violate strict
241                          * aliasing.  */
242                         u16 entry;
243                         __m128i v;
244                         __m128i *p;
245                         unsigned n;
246
247                         entry = MAKE_DIRECT_ENTRY(sorted_syms[sym_idx], codeword_len);
248
249                         v = _mm_set1_epi16(entry);
250                         p = (__m128i*)decode_table_ptr;
251                         n = stores_per_loop;
252                         do {
253                                 *p++ = v;
254                         } while (--n);
255                         decode_table_ptr = p;
256                 }
257         }
258 #endif /* USE_SSE2_FILL */
259
260 #ifdef USE_WORD_FILL
261         /* Fill the entries one machine word at a time.
262          * On 32-bit systems this is 2 entries per store, while on 64-bit
263          * systems this is 4 entries per store.  */
264         stores_per_loop = (1 << (table_bits - codeword_len)) / entries_per_word;
265         for (; stores_per_loop != 0; codeword_len++, stores_per_loop >>= 1) {
266                 unsigned end_sym_idx = sym_idx + len_counts[codeword_len];
267                 for (; sym_idx < end_sym_idx; sym_idx++) {
268
269                         /* Accessing the array of u16 as u32 or u64 would
270                          * violate strict aliasing and would require compiling
271                          * the code with -fno-strict-aliasing to guarantee
272                          * correctness.  To work around this problem, use the
273                          * gcc 'may_alias' extension.  */
274                         typedef machine_word_t _may_alias_attribute aliased_word_t;
275
276                         machine_word_t v;
277                         aliased_word_t *p;
278                         unsigned n;
279
280                         BUILD_BUG_ON(WORDSIZE != 4 && WORDSIZE != 8);
281
282                         v = MAKE_DIRECT_ENTRY(sorted_syms[sym_idx], codeword_len);
283                         v |= v << 16;
284                         v |= v << (WORDSIZE == 8 ? 32 : 0);
285
286                         p = (aliased_word_t *)decode_table_ptr;
287                         n = stores_per_loop;
288
289                         do {
290                                 *p++ = v;
291                         } while (--n);
292                         decode_table_ptr = p;
293                 }
294         }
295 #endif /* USE_WORD_FILL */
296
297         /* Fill the entries one 16-bit integer at a time.  */
298         stores_per_loop = (1 << (table_bits - codeword_len));
299         for (; stores_per_loop != 0; codeword_len++, stores_per_loop >>= 1) {
300                 unsigned end_sym_idx = sym_idx + len_counts[codeword_len];
301                 for (; sym_idx < end_sym_idx; sym_idx++) {
302                         u16 entry;
303                         u16 *p;
304                         unsigned n;
305
306                         entry = MAKE_DIRECT_ENTRY(sorted_syms[sym_idx], codeword_len);
307
308                         p = (u16*)decode_table_ptr;
309                         n = stores_per_loop;
310
311                         do {
312                                 *p++ = entry;
313                         } while (--n);
314
315                         decode_table_ptr = p;
316                 }
317         }
318
319         /* If we've filled in the entire table, we are done.  Otherwise,
320          * there are codewords longer than table_bits for which we must
321          * generate binary trees.  */
322
323         decode_table_pos = (u16*)decode_table_ptr - decode_table;
324         if (decode_table_pos != table_num_entries) {
325                 unsigned j;
326                 unsigned next_free_tree_slot;
327                 unsigned cur_codeword;
328
329                 /* First, zero out the remaining entries.  This is
330                  * necessary so that these entries appear as
331                  * "unallocated" in the next part.  Each of these entries
332                  * will eventually be filled with the representation of
333                  * the root node of a binary tree.  */
334                 j = decode_table_pos;
335                 do {
336                         decode_table[j] = 0;
337                 } while (++j != table_num_entries);
338
339                 /* We allocate child nodes starting at the end of the
340                  * direct lookup table.  Note that there should be
341                  * 2*num_syms extra entries for this purpose, although
342                  * fewer than this may actually be needed.  */
343                 next_free_tree_slot = table_num_entries;
344
345                 /* Iterate through each codeword with length greater than
346                  * 'table_bits', primarily in order of codeword length
347                  * and secondarily in order of symbol.  */
348                 for (cur_codeword = decode_table_pos << 1;
349                      codeword_len <= max_codeword_len;
350                      codeword_len++, cur_codeword <<= 1)
351                 {
352                         unsigned end_sym_idx = sym_idx + len_counts[codeword_len];
353                         for (; sym_idx < end_sym_idx; sym_idx++, cur_codeword++)
354                         {
355                                 /* 'sym' is the symbol represented by the
356                                  * codeword.  */
357                                 unsigned sym = sorted_syms[sym_idx];
358
359                                 unsigned extra_bits = codeword_len - table_bits;
360
361                                 unsigned node_idx = cur_codeword >> extra_bits;
362
363                                 /* Go through each bit of the current codeword
364                                  * beyond the prefix of length @table_bits and
365                                  * walk the appropriate binary tree, allocating
366                                  * any slots that have not yet been allocated.
367                                  *
368                                  * Note that the 'pointer' entry to the binary
369                                  * tree, which is stored in the direct lookup
370                                  * portion of the table, is represented
371                                  * identically to other internal (non-leaf)
372                                  * nodes of the binary tree; it can be thought
373                                  * of as simply the root of the tree.  The
374                                  * representation of these internal nodes is
375                                  * simply the index of the left child combined
376                                  * with the special bits 0xC000 to distingush
377                                  * the entry from direct mapping and leaf node
378                                  * entries.  */
379                                 do {
380
381                                         /* At least one bit remains in the
382                                          * codeword, but the current node is an
383                                          * unallocated leaf.  Change it to an
384                                          * internal node.  */
385                                         if (decode_table[node_idx] == 0) {
386                                                 decode_table[node_idx] =
387                                                         next_free_tree_slot | 0xC000;
388                                                 decode_table[next_free_tree_slot++] = 0;
389                                                 decode_table[next_free_tree_slot++] = 0;
390                                         }
391
392                                         /* Go to the left child if the next bit
393                                          * in the codeword is 0; otherwise go to
394                                          * the right child.  */
395                                         node_idx = decode_table[node_idx] & 0x3FFF;
396                                         --extra_bits;
397                                         node_idx += (cur_codeword >> extra_bits) & 1;
398                                 } while (extra_bits != 0);
399
400                                 /* We've traversed the tree using the entire
401                                  * codeword, and we're now at the entry where
402                                  * the actual symbol will be stored.  This is
403                                  * distinguished from internal nodes by not
404                                  * having its high two bits set.  */
405                                 decode_table[node_idx] = sym;
406                         }
407                 }
408         }
409         return 0;
410 }