Consistently use the name "solid resource"
[wimlib] / README
1                                   INTRODUCTION
2
3 This is wimlib version 1.7.5-BETA (January 2015).  wimlib is a C library for
4 creating, modifying, extracting, and mounting files in the Windows Imaging
5 Format (WIM files).  wimlib and its command-line frontend 'wimlib-imagex'
6 provide a free and cross-platform alternative to Microsoft's WIMGAPI, ImageX,
7 and DISM.
8
9                                   INSTALLATION
10
11 To install wimlib and wimlib-imagex on Windows, simply download and extract the
12 ZIP file containing the latest binaries from the SourceForge page
13 (http://sourceforge.net/projects/wimlib/).  You probably have already done this!
14
15 To install wimlib and wimlib-imagex on UNIX-like systems (with Linux being the
16 primary supported and tested platform), you must compile the source code, which
17 is also available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/wimlib/.  Alternatively,
18 check if a package has been prepared for your Linux distribution.  Example files
19 for Debian and RPM packaging are in the debian/ and rpm/ directories.
20
21                                     WIM FILES
22
23 A Windows Imaging (WIM) file is an archive designed primarily for archiving
24 Windows filesystems.  However, it can be used on other platforms as well, with
25 some limitations.  Like some other archive formats such as ZIP, files in WIM
26 archives may be compressed.  WIM files support multiple compression formats,
27 including LZX, XPRESS, and LZMS.  All these formats are supported by wimlib.
28
29 A WIM file consists of one or more "images".  Each image is an independent
30 top-level directory structure and is logically separate from all other images in
31 the WIM.  Each image has a name as well as a 1-based index in the WIM file.  To
32 save space, WIM archives automatically combine all duplicate files across all
33 images.
34
35 A WIM file may be either stand-alone or split into multiple parts.  Split WIMs
36 are read-only and cannot be modified.
37
38 Since version 1.6.0, wimlib also supports ESD (.esd) files, except when
39 encrypted.  These are still WIM files but they use a newer version of the file
40 format.
41
42                              IMAGEX IMPLEMENTATION
43
44 wimlib itself is a C library, and it provides a documented public API (See:
45 http://wimlib.sourceforge.net) for other programs to use.  However, it is also
46 distributed with a command-line program called "wimlib-imagex" that uses this
47 library to implement an imaging tool similar to Microsoft's ImageX.
48 wimlib-imagex supports almost all the capabilities of Microsoft's ImageX as well
49 as additional capabilities.  wimlib-imagex works on both UNIX-like systems and
50 Windows, although some features differ between the platforms.
51
52 Run `wimlib-imagex' with no arguments to see an overview of the available
53 commands and their syntax.  For additional documentation:
54
55   * If you have installed wimlib-imagex on a UNIX-like system, you will find
56     further documentation in the man pages; run `man wimlib-imagex' to get
57     started.
58
59   * If you have downloaded the Windows binary distribution, you will find the
60     documentation for wimlib-imagex in PDF format in the "doc" directory,
61     ready for viewing with any PDF viewer.  Please note that although the PDF
62     files are converted from UNIX-style "man pages", they do document
63     Windows-specific behavior when appropriate.
64
65                                 COMPRESSION RATIO
66
67 wimlib (and wimlib-imagex) can create XPRESS, LZX, or LZMS compressed WIM files.
68 wimlib includes its own compression codecs and does not use the compression API
69 available on some versions of Windows.
70
71 I have gradually been improving the compression codecs in wimlib.  For XPRESS
72 and LZX, they now usually outperform and outcompress the equivalent Microsoft
73 implementations.  Although results will vary depending on the data being
74 compressed, in the table below I present the results for a common use case:
75 compressing an x86 Windows PE image.  Each row displays the compression type,
76 the size of the resulting WIM file in bytes, and how many seconds it took to
77 create the file.  When applicable, the results with the equivalent Microsoft
78 implementation in WIMGAPI is included.
79
80   =============================================================================
81   | Compression            ||  wimlib (v1.7.5-BETA)  |  WIMGAPI (Windows 8.1) |
82   =============================================================================
83   | None             [1]   ||  361,314,224 in 2.4s   |  361,315,338 in 4.5s   |
84   | XPRESS           [2]   ||  138,218,750 in 3.0s   |  140,457,436 in 6.0s   |
85   | XPRESS (slow)    [3]   ||  135,173,511 in 8.9s   |  N/A                   |
86   | LZX (quick)      [4]   ||  130,207,195 in 3.8s   |  N/A                   |
87   | LZX (normal)     [5]   ||  126,522,539 in 10.4s  |  127,293,240 in 19.2s  |
88   | LZX (slow)       [6]   ||  126,042,313 in 17.3s  |  N/A                   |
89   | LZMS (non-solid) [7]   ||  121,909,792 in 11.9s  |  N/A                   |
90   | LZMS (solid)     [8]   ||  93,650,936  in 45.0s  |  88,771,192 in 109.2   |
91   | "WIMBoot"        [9]   ||  167,023,719 in 3.5s   |  169,109,211 in 10.4s  |
92   | "WIMBoot" (slow) [10]  ||  165,027,583 in 7.9s   |  N/A                   |
93   =============================================================================
94
95 Notes:
96    [1] '--compress=none' for wimlib-imagex; '/compress:none' for DISM.
97
98    [2] '--compress=XPRESS' for wimlib-imagex; '/compress:fast' for DISM.
99        Compression chunk size defaults to 32768 bytes in both cases.
100
101    [3] '--compress=XPRESS:80' for wimlib-imagex; no known equivalent for DISM.
102        Compression chunk size defaults to 32768 bytes.
103
104    [4] '--compress=LZX:20' for wimlib-imagex; no known equivalent for DISM.
105        Compression chunk size defaults to 32768 bytes.
106
107    [5] '--compress=LZX' or '--compress=LZX:50' or no option for wimlib-imagex;
108        '/compress:maximum' for DISM.
109        Compression chunk size defaults to 32768 bytes in both cases.
110
111    [6] '--compress=LZX:100' for wimlib-imagex; no known equivalent for DISM.
112        Compression chunk size defaults to 32768 bytes.
113
114    [7] '--compress=LZMS' for wimlib-imagex; no known equivalent for DISM.
115        Compression chunk size defaults to 131072 bytes.
116
117    [8] '--solid' for wimlib-imagex.  Should be '/compress:recovery' for DISM,
118        but only works for /Export-Image, not /Capture-Image.  Compression chunk
119        size in solid resources defaults to 33554432 for wimlib, 67108864 for
120        DISM.
121
122    [9] '--wimboot' for wimlib-imagex; '/wimboot' for DISM.
123        This is really XPRESS compression with 4096 byte chunks, so the same as
124        '--compress=XPRESS --chunk-size=4096'.
125
126    [10] '--wimboot --compress=XPRESS:80' for wimlib-imagex;
127         no known equivalent for DISM.
128         Same format as [9], but trying harder to get a good compression ratio.
129
130 Note: wimlib-imagex's --compress option also accepts the "fast", "maximum", and
131 "recovery" aliases for XPRESS, LZX, and LZMS, respectively.
132
133 Testing environment:
134
135     - 64 bit binaries
136     - Windows 8.1 virtual machine running on Linux with VT-x
137     - 4 CPUs and 4 GiB memory given to virtual machine
138     - SSD-backed virtual disk
139     - All tests done with page cache warmed
140
141 The compression ratio provided by wimlib is also competitive with commonly used
142 archive formats.  Below are file sizes that result when the Canterbury corpus is
143 compressed with wimlib (v1.7.2), WIMGAPI (Windows 8.1), and some other
144 formats/programs:
145
146      =====================================================
147      | Format                             | Size (bytes) |
148      =====================================================
149      | tar                                | 2,826,240    |
150      | WIM (WIMGAPI, None)                | 2,814,254    |
151      | WIM (wimlib, None)                 | 2,814,216    |
152      | WIM (WIMGAPI, XPRESS)              | 825,536      |
153      | WIM (wimlib, XPRESS)               | 789,296      |
154      | tar.gz (gzip, default)             | 738,796      |
155      | ZIP (Info-ZIP, default)            | 735,334      |
156      | tar.gz (gzip, -9)                  | 733,971      |
157      | ZIP (Info-ZIP, -9)                 | 732,297      |
158      | WIM (wimlib, LZX quick)            | 690,110      |
159      | WIM (WIMGAPI, LZX)                 | 651,866      |
160      | WIM (wimlib, LZX normal)           | 624,634      |
161      | WIM (wimlib, LZX slow)             | 620,728      |
162      | WIM (wimlib, LZMS non-solid)       | 581,960      |
163      | tar.bz2 (bzip, default)            | 565,008      |
164      | tar.bz2 (bzip, -9)                 | 565,008      |
165      | WIM (wimlib, LZX solid)            | 527,688      |
166      | WIM (wimlib, LZMS solid)           | 525,990      |
167      | WIM (wimlib, LZMS solid, slow)     | 523,728      |
168      | WIM (wimlib, LZX solid, slow)      | 522,042      |
169      | WIM (WIMGAPI, LZMS solid)          | 521,366      |
170      | WIM (wimlib, LZX solid, very slow) | 519,546      |
171      | tar.xz (xz, default)               | 486,916      |
172      | tar.xz (xz, -9)                    | 486,904      |
173      | 7z  (7-zip, default)               | 484,700      |
174      | 7z  (7-zip, -9)                    | 483,239      |
175      =====================================================
176
177 Note: WIM does even better on directory trees containing duplicate files, which
178 the Canterbury corpus doesn't have.
179
180                                   NTFS SUPPORT
181
182 WIM images may contain data, such as alternate data streams and
183 compression/encryption flags, that are best represented on the NTFS filesystem
184 used on Windows.  Also, WIM images may contain security descriptors which are
185 specific to Windows and cannot be represented on other operating systems.
186 wimlib handles this NTFS-specific or Windows-specific data in a
187 platform-dependent way:
188
189   * In the Windows version of wimlib and wimlib-imagex, NTFS-specific and
190     Windows-specific data are supported natively.
191
192   * In the UNIX version of wimlib and wimlib-imagex, NTFS-specific and
193     Windows-specific data are ordinarily ignored; however, there is also special
194     support for capturing and extracting images directly to/from unmounted NTFS
195     volumes.  This was made possible with the help of libntfs-3g from the
196     NTFS-3g project.
197
198 For both platforms the code for NTFS capture and extraction is complete enough
199 that it is possible to apply an image from the "install.wim" contained in recent
200 Windows installation media (Vista, Windows 7, or Windows 8) directly to an NTFS
201 filesystem, and then boot Windows from it after preparing the Boot Configuration
202 Data.  In addition, a Windows installation can be captured (or backed up) into a
203 WIM file, and then re-applied later.
204
205                                    WINDOWS PE
206
207 A major use for wimlib and wimlib-imagex is to create customized images of
208 Windows PE, the Windows Preinstallation Environment, on either UNIX-like systems
209 or Windows without having to rely on Microsoft's software and its restrictions
210 and limitations.
211
212 Windows PE is a lightweight version of Windows that can run entirely from memory
213 and can be used to install Windows from local media or a network drive or
214 perform maintenance.  It is the operating system that runs when you boot from
215 the Windows installation media.
216
217 You can find Windows PE on the installation DVD for Windows Vista, Windows 7, or
218 Windows 8, in the file `sources/boot.wim'.  Windows PE can also be found in the
219 Windows Automated Installation Kit (WAIK), which is free to download from
220 Microsoft, inside the `WinPE.cab' file, which you can extract natively on
221 Windows, or on UNIX-like systems if you install either the `cabextract' or
222 `p7zip' programs.
223
224 In addition, Windows installations and recovery partitions frequently contain a
225 WIM containing an image of the Windows Recovery Environment, which is similar to
226 Windows PE.
227
228 A shell script `mkwinpeimg' is distributed with wimlib on UNIX-like systems to
229 ease the process of creating and customizing a bootable Windows PE image.
230
231                                   DEPENDENCIES
232
233 This section documents the dependencies of wimlib and the programs distributed
234 with it, when building for a UNIX-like system from source.  If you have
235 downloaded the Windows binary distribution of wimlib and wimlib-imagex then all
236 dependencies were already included and this section is irrelevant.
237
238 * libxml2 (required)
239         This is a commonly used free library to read and write XML documents.
240         Almost all Linux distributions should include this; however, you may
241         need to install the header files, which might be in a package named
242         "libxml2-dev" or similar.  For more information see http://xmlsoft.org/.
243
244 * libfuse (optional but recommended)
245         Unless configured --without-fuse, wimlib requires a non-ancient version
246         of libfuse.  Most Linux distributions already include this, but make
247         sure you have the libfuse package installed, and also libfuse-dev if
248         your distribution distributes header files separately.  FUSE also
249         requires a kernel module.  If the kernel module is available it should
250         automatically be loaded if you try to mount a WIM image.  For more
251         information see http://fuse.sourceforge.net/.
252
253 * libattr (optional but recommended)
254         Unless configured --without-fuse, wimlib also requires libattr.  Almost
255         all Linux distributions should include this; however, you may need to
256         install the header files, which might be in a package named "attr-dev",
257         "libattr1-dev", or similar.
258
259 * libntfs-3g (optional but recommended)
260         Unless configured --without-ntfs-3g, wimlib requires the library and
261         headers for libntfs-3g version 2011-4-12 or later to be installed.
262
263 * OpenSSL / libcrypto (optional)
264         wimlib can use the SHA-1 message digest implementation from libcrypto
265         (usually provided by OpenSSL) instead of compiling in yet another SHA-1
266         implementation.
267
268 * cdrkit (optional)
269 * mtools (optional)
270 * syslinux (optional)
271 * cabextract (optional)
272         The `mkwinpeimg' shell script will look for several other programs
273         depending on what options are given to it.  Depending on your Linux
274         distribution, you may already have these programs installed, or they may
275         be in the software repository.  Making an ISO filesystem requires
276         `mkisofs' from `cdrkit' (http://www.cdrkit.org).  Making a disk image
277         requires `mtools' (http://www.gnu.org/software/mtools) and `syslinux'
278         (http://www.syslinux.org).  Retrieving files from the Windows Automated
279         Installation Kit requires `cabextract' (http://www.cabextract.org.uk).
280
281                                  CONFIGURATION
282
283 This section documents the most important options that may be passed to the
284 "configure" script when building from source:
285
286 --without-ntfs-3g
287         If libntfs-3g is not available or is not version 2011-4-12 or later,
288         wimlib can be built without it, in which case it will not be possible to
289         capture or apply WIM images directly from/to NTFS volumes.
290
291         The default is --with-ntfs-3g when building for any UNIX-like system,
292         and --without-ntfs-3g when building for Windows.
293
294 --without-fuse
295         The --without-fuse option completely disables support for mounting WIM
296         images.  This removes dependencies on libfuse, librt, and libattr.  The
297         wimmount, wimmountrw, and wimunmount commands will not work.
298
299         The default is --with-fuse when building for Linux, and --without-fuse
300         otherwise.
301
302 --without-libcrypto
303         Build in functions for SHA-1 rather than using external SHA-1 functions
304         from libcrypto (usually provided by OpenSSL).
305
306         The default is to use libcrypto if it is found on your system.
307
308                                   PORTABILITY
309
310 wimlib works on both UNIX-like systems (Linux, Mac OS X, FreeBSD, etc.) and
311 Windows (XP and later).
312
313 As much code as possible is shared among all supported platforms, but there
314 necessarily are some differences in what features are supported on each platform
315 and how they are implemented.  Most notable is that file tree scanning and
316 extraction are implemented separately for Windows, UNIX, and UNIX (NTFS-3g
317 mode), to ensure a fast and feature-rich implementation of each platform/mode.
318
319 wimlib is mainly used on x86 and x86_64 CPUs, but it should also work on a
320 number of other GCC-supported 32-bit or 64-bit architectures.  It has been
321 tested on the ARM architecture.
322
323 Currently, gcc and clang are the only supported compilers.  A few nonstandard
324 extensions are used in the code.
325
326                                    REFERENCES
327
328 The WIM file format is partially specified in a document that can be found in
329 the Microsoft Download Center.  However, this document really only provides an
330 overview of the format and is not a formal specification.  It also does not
331 cover later extensions of the format, such as solid resources.
332
333 With regards to the supported compression formats:
334
335 - Microsoft has official documentation for XPRESS that is of reasonable quality.
336 - Microsoft has official documentation for LZX, but in two different documents,
337   neither of which is completely applicable to its use in the WIM format, and
338   the first of which contains multiple errors.
339 - There does not seem to be any official documentation for LZMS, so my comments
340   and code in src/lzms_decompress.c may in fact be the best documentation
341   available for this particular compression format.
342
343 The algorithms used by wimlib's compression and decompression codecs are
344 inspired by a variety of sources, including open source projects and computer
345 science papers.
346
347 The code in ntfs-3g_apply.c and ntfs-3g_capture.c uses the NTFS-3g library,
348 which is a library for reading and writing to NTFS filesystems (the filesystem
349 used by recent versions of Windows).  See
350 http://www.tuxera.com/community/ntfs-3g-download/ for more information.
351
352 A limited number of other free programs can handle some parts of the WIM
353 file format:
354
355   * 7-zip is able to extract and create WIMs (as well as files in many
356     other archive formats).  However, wimlib is designed specifically to handle
357     WIM files and provides features previously only available in Microsoft's
358     implementation, such as the ability to mount WIMs read-write as well as
359     read-only, the ability to create compressed WIMs, the correct handling of
360     security descriptors and hard links, support for LZMS compression, and
361     support for solid archives.
362   * ImagePyX (https://github.com/maxpat78/ImagePyX) is a Python program that
363     provides similar capabilities to wimlib-imagex.  One thing to note, though,
364     is that it does not support compression and decompression by itself, but
365     instead relies on external native code, such as the codecs from wimlib.
366
367 If you are looking for an archive format that provides features similar to WIM
368 but was designed primarily for UNIX, you may want to consider SquashFS
369 (http://squashfs.sourceforge.net/).  However, you may find that wimlib works
370 surprisingly well on UNIX.  It will store hard links and symbolic links, and it
371 has optional support for storing UNIX owners, groups, modes, and special files
372 such as device nodes and FIFOs.  Actually, I use it to back up my own files on
373 Linux!
374
375                              LICENSE AND DISCLAIMER
376
377 See COPYING for information about the license.
378
379 wimlib is independently developed and does not contain any code, data, or files
380 copyrighted by Microsoft.  It is not known to be affected by any patents.
381
382 On UNIX-like systems, if you do not want wimlib to be dynamically linked with
383 libcrypto (OpenSSL), configure with --without-libcrypto.  This replaces the SHA1
384 implementation with built-in code and there will be no difference in
385 functionality.
386
387 wimlib comes with no warranty whatsoever.  Please submit a bug report (to
388 ebiggers3@gmail.com) if you find a bug in wimlib and/or wimlib-imagex.